The Substance Art of Maciej Górnicki

Pierre Bosset on May 17 2016 | News, Stories, Game

Who are you?

My name is Maciej Górnicki.

 

Where are you based?

I originally come from Opole, which is a small town in Poland. Currently, I live in beautiful Helsinki, Finland.

 

What do you do?
I’m a Technical Artist in a game company.

 

Your portfolio and website?

ArtStation: https://www.artstation.com/artist/dasp
Tumblr: http://dasparion.tumblr.com

He describes himself as “just a normal guy who loves art”. His stylized artworks, though, are pretty awesome. In this interview, Maciej Górnicki tells us more about his approach to 3D art.

Tell us a little bit more about yourself.


My background is quite technical. My passion for 3D art came late in my life, as I was introduced to it during my second year of studies. From that point, I was certain that this is direction that I wanted to take. I have over four years of experience in game industry, mostly in smaller companies where each person needs to be very versatile in order to cover many different aspects of the project. That is why I often use graphic programming and programming to enhance projects that I work on. I try to learn many different skills with one goal in mind: making my art better.

 


How did you discover the Allegorithmic tools?


I have known about Allegorithmic for some time now, mainly because it was a great new addition to Unity engine at some point. When Allegorithmic introduced Substance Painter in first teaser video where you could see physical paint, I was sold automatically. From that point, I started learning Substance Painter and Substance Designer.

The Stylized Viking Armory project

"Many artists are wondering if physically based rendering is appropriate for stylized art. I believe it’s just another technology that allows you to create better and more consistent art based on real world values. Stylized or realistic, it’s not even a question."

Tell us more about some of your latest projects: Stylized Viking Armory, Alchemist House and Knowledge.


My goal for Alchemist House was to stay as close as possible to original concept but at the same time I wanted to use PBR for all the materials. I saw that many artists are wondering if physically based rendering is appropriate for stylized art. I believe it’s just another technology that allows you to create better and more consistent art based on real world values. Stylized or realistic, it’s not even a question.


Knowledge was made in a very short time just for fun of doing it. I got excited after looking at the concept and just made it during the weekend.


Stylized Viking Armory was made for the Unity Asset Store. My goal was to create stylized procedural weapons that could be modified and used in many different projects. I used Blend Shapes (feature in Unity) and Substance Designer to create many interesting variations. All weapons can change their shape, size, materials and other properties like the amount of blood.

 


What are your sources of inspiration?


My main inspiration comes from my personal goals, but I am often motivated by the creativity of other people. I like to take a challenging project to improve my skills. Besides that, some of the artworks are just so good that it’s a shame to not make a 3D version of them! Knowledge and Alchemist House are based on incredible concepts from other artists.

The Knowledge project

"What I like about Allegorithmic’s toolset is that it cooperates with popular game engines and makes connection between them really smooth. My main tool for texturing is Substance Painter and I use it in all of my projects."

How did Substance integrate into your workflow?


As a technical artist, I always try to improve my own and others’ workflow so, I have a lot of  requirements for the tools that I use. I always look for ways to make my work as smooth as possible. What I like about Allegorithmic’s toolset is that it cooperates with popular game engines and makes connection between them really smooth. My main tool for texturing is Substance Painter and I use it in all of my projects.

 


Tell us a bit more about what your typical workflow looks like.


Most of the time I start with small research about specific topics. If I’m doing art based on a concept, I dive more quickly into modeling since I prefer to do a rough sketch in 3D. I start with a quick block-out in 3D. Then slowly I move into more details and every now and then I slow down and check how things are going in the bigger picture. Mostly I use Modo and Zbrush as my main modeling tools.

Next, I switch to Substance Painter and do quick color test to check how everything feels and works together. After this I do few iterations with colors to get an idea of what I want to achieve with the texture and slowly go more into details.


The last part of my work comes down to importing assets into a realtime engine and setting up the scene to create the final composition.

"Artists don’t need to focus on separate textures, they can just stay creative."

How did your use of Substance change your approach to texturing?


Using Substance definitely made my iterations much faster. I can prototype new assets much faster. But biggest advantage is that Substance Painter allows you to paint with materials: for me this was biggest revolution in the texturing workflow. Artists don’t need to focus on separate textures, they can just stay creative.

 


What was your biggest challenge and how did you address it?


My day-to-day challenge is to stay objective with my art. My solution is to keep fighting!

 


Do you have any tips/tricks to share with the community or just some things you particularly like doing with Substance?


“Less is more.” This is state of mind that I try to keep when doing projects. I’m often tempted to put more and more details into some piece of art that I’m doing. Then I always remind myself that putting less often makes the art more approachable for others.
 

The Stylized Viking Armory project

What are your next projects?


That is a secret ;-)

 


What is your favorite ice cream?


Triple chocolate. Chocolate ice-cream with chocolate pieces and hot Belgian chocolate as a dip!

On Facebook

Recommended Articles

Vincent Gault on April 14 2016 | News, Stories, Game
Claudia Vance on April 12 2016 | News, Stories, Game
Jeremie Noguer on March 1 2016 | News, Stories, Game
Pierre Bosset on February 18 2016 | News, Stories, Game